Auckland’s population falls for the first time – Stats NZ media and information release: Subnational population estimates: At 30 June 2021 (provisional)

Auckland’s population falls for the first time – Media release

22 October 2021

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, New Zealand’s population growth slowed down with Auckland recording a population decline for the first time ever, Stats NZ said today.

“New Zealand saw slowing population growth in all regions,” population estimates and projections manager Hamish Slack said.

“COVID-19 international travel restrictions continued to curb population increases from international migration in the June 2021 year.”

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Employment indicators Weekly as at 18 October 2021 – Stats NZ information release

Employment indicators Weekly as at 18 October 2021

21 October 2021

Key facts
The 6-day series includes jobs with a pay period equal to or less than 7 days, while the 20-day series covers jobs with pay periods of 14 days or fewer. The 34-day series includes all jobs regardless of their pay period.

The 34-day series indicated that for the latest week, the week ended 12 September 2021:    

  • the number of paid jobs (compared with the previous week) were:
    • 2,277,510 total paid jobs (down 11,810 or 0.52 percent)
    • 100,760 paid jobs in primary industries (down 880 or 0.87 percent)
    • 429,840 paid jobs in goods-producing industries (down 1,830 or 0.42 percent)
    • 1,687,660 paid jobs in services industries (down 8,680 or 0.51 percent)
    • 59,260 paid jobs in unclassified industries (down 410 or 0.69 percent)
  • the median income (compared with the previous week) was:
    • $1,070.04 (up $12.35 or 1.17 percent).

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Household spending outpaces income in the June 2021 quarter – Stats NZ media and information release: National accounts (income, saving, assets, and liabilities): June 2021 quarter

Household spending outpaces income in the June 2021 quarter – Media release

21 October 2021

Households continued to spend more than their income in the June 2021 quarter, with negative saving of $225 million following a revised March 2021 negative saving of $239 million, Stats NZ said today.

“After high levels of saving through 2020, impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, households have spent more than they have earned during the first half of 2021,” national accounts senior manager Paul Pascoe said.

The total income receivable for households rose 1.0 percent in the June 2021 quarter. Important contributors to this rise were a 2.4 percent increase in the total salaries and benefits received from employers, and a 2.1 percent increase in entrepreneurial income, which reflects income for self-employed business owners and partnerships. This rise in household income reflects the increased wage rates and higher employment rate observed in the Labour market statistics: June 2021 quarter.

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Effects of COVID-19 on trade: At 13 October 2021 (provisional) – Stats NZ information release

Effects of COVID-19 on trade: At 13 October 2021 (provisional)

20 October 2021

Effects of COVID-19 on trade is a weekly update on New Zealand’s daily goods trade with the world. Comparing the values with previous years shows the potential impacts of COVID-19.

The data is provisional and should be regarded as an early, indicative estimate of intentions to trade only, subject to revision.

We advise caution in making decisions based on this data.

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Stats NZ release notification

Dear subscriber

Below you can find Stats NZ’s information releases for the next week. For more information about these releases go to Insights and make your selections in the drop-down options.

21 October 2021
Employment indicators: Weekly as at 18 October 2021
View recent employment indicators releases

22 October 2021
Subnational population estimates: At 30 June 2021 (provisional)
View recent subnational population estimates releases

26 October 2021
Serious injury outcome indicators: 2000–2020
View recent serious injury outcome indicators releases

27 October 2021
Overseas merchandise trade: September 2021
View recent overseas merchandise trade releases

Effects of COVID-19 on trade: At 20 October 2021 (provisional)
View recent effects of COVID-19 on trade releases

Other publications we’re working on

21 October 2021
National Accounts (income, saving, assets, and liabilities): June 2021 quarter

26 October 2021
Work-related injury targets at a glance: 2008–2020

Our release calendar has a full list of release dates for official statistics.

The release calendar is updated six months ahead, but dates may change due to events related to COVID-19.

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2023 Census first to collect gender and sexual identity from everyone in Aotearoa New Zealand – Stats NZ

2023 Census first to collect gender and sexual identity from everyone in Aotearoa New Zealand

19 October 2021

The 2023 Census will be the first to ask everyone in Aotearoa New Zealand about their gender, sexual identity, and whether they have any variations of sex characteristics (also known as intersex status), Stats NZ said today.

The confirmation came through the publication of the 2023 Census: Final content report, which confirms all the topics that will be collected in the 2023 Census.

“People’s sense of their gender and sexual identity is really important to them and can impact on their lives and experiences. The census touches everyone and will provide a detailed picture of how people with diverse genders and sexual identities experience life in Aotearoa New Zealand. The data will also inform better decision making and provision of services for the Rainbow community,” social and population insights general manager Jason Attewell said.

“We are already collecting sexual identity and gender in our other household surveys and that is going well. It is important that everyone is able to see themselves in – and take part in – the census.”

Collecting information on gender and sexual identity in the census will allow more detailed geographic breakdowns of the data produced than may be possible for data collected in household surveys.

The 2023 Census also marks the first time in any Stats NZ survey that information will be collected on variations of sex characteristics (also known as intersex status).

“This is exciting because for the first time we will have data about the intersex community and just how many people in Aotearoa New Zealand are part of this community,” Mr Attewell said.

Questions on sexual identity (for example, heterosexual, gay, or lesbian) and variations of sex characteristics will only be asked of people aged 15 years or older.

Just as for other information collected in the census, it will be important to get good quality responses to these new questions. This will help ensure the data is of sufficient quality to be released and fit for use by communities and decision makers. If the data is not of sufficient quality, we may not be able to release it.

“The most important thing people can do to ensure we can release data for every question is to fill in all of their census form. The more answers we collect, the better the quality of the data and the more useful and usable it will be,” Deputy Government Statistician and Deputy Chief Executive for Census and Collection Operations Simon Mason said.

“We know we have a part to play too, by making the census accessible and easy for everyone to complete, and we’re working hard to do this.”

Final decisions on the content for the 2023 Census were informed by engagement and testing following the publication of the preliminary views on 2023 Census content in 2020.

Other changes to 2023 content

Other changes to content for the 2023 Census are:

  • that the information collected on sex will now be sex at birth, whereas previously we collected information on sex without further clarifying what that meant
  • the collection of additional information on activity limitations/disability
  • the reinstatement of a question on phone number  
  • the reinstatement of a question on the number of census night occupants.

The additional information collected on activity limitations/disability will be whether a person has a disability, long-term condition, or mental health condition that limits their ability to carry out everyday activities. This will capture a larger group of disabled people, who may be missed by the existing questions on activity limitations (difficulty with seeing, hearing, walking or climbing steps, remembering or concentrating, washing all over or dressing, and communicating).

This additional information will be used to select the sample for the 2023 New Zealand Disability Survey that will take place after the 2023 Census. Reinstating the phone number question for the 2023 Census will enable us to contact people by phone to participate in this survey.

The purpose of reinstating number of census night occupants is to help improve overall data quality for population and dwelling counts and for family and household data, and to make our collection processes more efficient.

How we developed the 2023 Census content

Although a small selection of new questions has been added, the scope for content changes for the 2023 Census outside these topics was limited. The range of information collected previously has been retained with a small number of additions and improvements.

“The focus for 2023 is to deliver quality data for the range of content already collected. We didn’t get the response rates we should have in 2018, which affected the quality of the data we could provide, particularly for the critically important iwi affiliation variable,” Mr Mason said.

“For 2023 we are focusing on doing a better job of collecting the data, including working with iwi and Māori as partners to Te Tiriti and with community partners to do so.”

Aotearoa New Zealand’s census currently collects a wide range of information by international standards. One benefit of the limited content change for 2023 is that it helps to maintain data comparability over time, making it easier to do time series analysis.

Another factor in the decision to limit content change for 2023 was the number of changes made to the forms between 2013 and 2018. Significant consultation and review were undertaken before the 2018 Census, which informed these changes.

Census data has many important uses such as allocating funding for health and education, making decisions on facilities needed in local areas, and understanding the wellbeing of population groups in Aotearoa New Zealand, including local, ethnic, and other communities.

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Inflation highest in over a decade – Stats NZ media and information release: Consumers price index: September 2021 quarter

Inflation highest in over a decade – Media release

18 October 2021

The consumers price index rose 2.2 percent in the September 2021 quarter, the biggest quarterly movement since a 2.3 percent rise in the December 2010 quarter, Stats NZ said today.

Excluding quarters impacted by increases to GST rates, the September quarter movement was the highest since the June 1987 quarter, which saw a 3.3 percent rise.

Annual inflation was 4.9 percent in the September 2021 quarter when compared with the September 2020 quarter. This was the biggest annual movement since inflation reached 5.3 percent between the June 2010 and June 2011 quarters.

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