Statistics New Zealand release schedule

Below you can find Stats NZ’s information releases for the next week. For more information about these releases go to Insights and make your selections in the drop down options.

6 July 2018
Dwelling and household estimates: June 2018 quarter
View recent Dwelling and household estimates releases

10 July 2018
Electronic card transactions: June 2018
View recent Electronic card transactions releases

11 July 2018
Accommodation survey: May 2018
View recent Accommodation survey releases

Our release calendar has a full list of release dates for official statistics.

Information releases include the latest statistics for the subject, with a summary (in the Key facts section), statistical Tables, and links to metadata and related information.

M = a media conference will be held for this release.

Return on assets highest since global financial crisis – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Annual enterprise survey: 2017 financial year (provisional)

Return on assets highest since global financial crisis – Increased profitability across the economy in 2017 contributed to the highest return on assets since the global financial crisis, Stats NZ said today. For all industries combined, the return on assets in the 2017 financial year was 4.4 percent.

Statistics released today from the 2017 Annual Enterprise Survey show various measures of business operations in New Zealand. One of these measures is ‘return on assets’. Return on assets measures how profitable a company is relative to the value of its total assets.

Since 2009, for all industries combined, the return on assets has varied from 2.6 percent to 4.4 percent, and has averaged 3.4 percent.

The return on assets, however, is not evenly distributed across industries. Manufacturing, construction, retail trade, and transport were among those that had increases over recent years. Mining declined, while other industries such as financial and insurance services, and rental, hiring and real estate services industries remained relatively flat.

The return on assets varied between the primary and goods-producing industries (eg agriculture and manufacturing) and the service industries (eg retail trade and telecommunications). For example, since 2009 the average return on assets for primary and goods-producing industries was 4.6 percent. For the service industries, it was 3.1 percent for the same period.

The graph below shows how the return on assets has changed since 2009, and the different contributions made by the primary and goods-producing, and service industries.

The Annual Enterprise Survey (AES) is New Zealand’s most comprehensive source of financial statistics covering almost 469,000 businesses. It provides annual information on the financial performance and financial position for industry groups operating in New Zealand.

In AES 2017, more detailed information is freely available. Downloadable tables have more years of data, and our Business Performance Benchmarker now has benchmarks for over 200 industries.

For more information about these statistics:

                                 Tables (Excel)      

 (See attached file: annual-enterprise-survey-2017-financial-year-provisional.xlsx)
annual-enterprise-survey-2017-financial-year-provisional.xlsx

Business assets reach almost $2.0 trillion – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Annual enterprise survey: 2017 financial year (provisional)

Business assets reach almost $2.0 trillion – At the end of the 2017 financial year, New Zealand businesses held assets valued at almost $2.0 trillion ($1,969 billion), Stats NZ said today.

“The value of business assets continued to increase in 2017, up 2.9 percent,” national accounts senior manager Gary Dunnet said.

This rate was below the level of growth in the previous two years, when assets increased 6.1 percent in 2016 and 6.2 percent in 2015.

Since 2013, the fastest growth occurred in the value of fixed assets (eg buildings, and plant and equipment) up 22.1 percent. Current assets (eg cash and deposits) increased 15.9 percent and other assets increased 18.6 percent during this period.

Growth in fixed assets remained high for the last three years, peaking in 2015 at 8.6 percent. In 2017, the value of fixed assets increased 5.8 percent.

“In 2017, almost three-fifths of the value of New Zealand’s business fixed assets were held in only two industry groups,” Mr Dunnet said. These two groups were agriculture, forestry and fishing; and rental, hiring and real estate services.

In agriculture, forestry and fishing, 92.2 percent of fixed assets sit in farming industries. In rental, hiring and real estate services, 92.7 percent of fixed assets are held by commercial property operators.

These two industry groups have also dominated growth since 2013. Agriculture, forestry and fishing had a growth of 20.2 percent in fixed asset value, while that for rental, hiring and real estate services grew 32.7 percent. Other industry groups combined saw a 15.1 percent increase in the value of their fixed assets.

The Annual Enterprise Survey (AES) is New Zealand’s most comprehensive source of financial statistics covering almost 469,000 businesses. It provides annual information on the financial performance and financial position for industry groups operating in New Zealand.

In AES 2017, more detailed information is freely available. Downloadable tables have more years of data, and Business Performance Benchmarker now has benchmarks for over 200 industries.

For more information about these statistics:

New home consents in Auckland reach 15-year high – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Building consents issued: May 2018

New home consents in Auckland reach 15-year high – In Auckland, 1,530 new homes were consented in May 2018, the highest number since October 2002, Stats NZ said today.

“Auckland consented more new homes in May 2018 than in any other month in over 15 years,” construction statistics manager Melissa McKenzie said.  “Almost half the new homes were stand-alone houses, with apartments and townhouses driving growth in recent months.”

In Auckland, 710 new stand-alone houses, 419 apartments, 258 townhouses, flats, and units, and 143 retirement village units were consented in May 2018.

The October 2002 peak of 1,945 new homes consented in Auckland came mainly from 1,206 apartments.

Auckland boosted the national total to 3,407 new homes consented – the highest monthly number since 3,447 were consented across the country in June 2004.

The total number of new homes consented in New Zealand rose a seasonally adjusted 7.1 percent in May 2018, following a 3.6 percent fall in April 2018. For houses only, the seasonally adjusted number rose 6.5 percent.

Nationally, in the year ended May 2018, 32,628 new homes were consented – up 6.5 percent from the May 2017 year. In Auckland, 12,274 new homes were consented – up 18 percent from the year ended May 2017.

Video

View our Building consents issued: May 2018 video.

For more information about these statistics:

                  Tables (Excel)      

 (See attached file: building-consents-issued-may-2018.xlsx)

Rising property prices boost household assets – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: National accounts (change in assets): 2008–16

Rising property prices boost household assets – Rising property prices from 2013 to 2016 boosted the New Zealand household sector’s assets by $184 billion, Stats NZ said today. The sector’s net worth reached $1,312 billion in March 2016.

The growth in property values over the four years contributed 51 percent of the $364 billion rise in household net worth over this period. In comparison, household property values rose $1.5 billion over the five years from 2008 to 2012.

When properties are bought and sold, the prices paid establish new market valuations for all properties, not just the ones bought and sold. This has a general effect on property values for all property-owning households.

From 2013 to 2016, the household sector borrowed additional loans of $36 billion. During the same period, households deposited an extra $45 billion at banks, but they withdrew $6 billion from their equity and investment fund asset holdings.

“From 2008 to 2016 households lent more than they borrowed,” national accounts senior manager Gary Dunnet said.

Within the economy, some sectors have an overall requirement for more financial resources than they generate; other sectors are net lenders, and are a source of funds to the net borrowers.

Businesses generate the main demand for financial resources. Incorporated non-financial enterprises were the largest net borrowers from 2008 to 2016. Unincorporated enterprises were also net borrowers. Central government also ran budget deficits over much of this period.

The main funding sources for 2008 to 2016 were overseas lenders, households, investment funds, and the EQC and ACC schemes that are administered by central government. Pension funds were not significant lenders in their own right, but they provided resources to investment funds.

“These are some of the results from this first release of provisional accumulation accounts for New Zealand,” Mr Dunnet said.

“This set of statistics adds to the suite of integrated national accounts statistics for the country.”

The accumulation accounts record changes in the value of assets and liabilities between balance sheet positions. These changes can occur from transactions, and from non-transactional changes such as changes in market value and other volume changes in assets and liabilities (eg a write-off of house values due to catastrophic earthquakes).

These accumulation statistics will be updated in December 2018. The accumulation accounts are the second stage of a four-stage programme to improve our national accounts. The next stage is to compile the accounts each quarter, which is due for release in the first half of 2020.

For more information about these statistics:

Tables (Excel)      

 (See attached file: accumulation-accounts-2008-16-provisional-table1-all-sectors-by-year.xlsx)(See attached file: accumulation-accounts-2008-16-provisional-table2-institutional-sectors.xlsx)(See attached file: annual-balance-sheets-2007-16-provisional-updated-table1-all-sectors-by-year.xlsx)(See attached file: annual-balance-sheets-2007-16-provisional-updated-table2-institutional-sectors.xlsx)(See attached file: annual-balance-sheets-2007-16-provisional-updated-table3-total-domestic-economy.xlsx)

Stats NZ release notification

Below you can find Stats NZ’s information releases for the next week. For more information about these releases go to Insights and make your selections in the drop down options.

28 June 2018
National accounts (change in assets): 2008–16 – new release

29 June 2018
Annual enterprise survey: 2017 financial year (provisional)
View recent Annual enterprise survey releases

Building consents issued: May 2018
View recent Building consents issued releases

Our release calendar has a full list of release dates for official statistics.

Information releases include the latest statistics for the subject, with a summary (in the Key facts section), statistical Tables, and links to metadata and related information.

M = a media conference will be held for this release.

Lamb exports set new record – Stats NZ Media and Information Release: Overseas merchandise trade: May 2018

Lamb exports set new record – The value of lamb exports hit a new record of $369 million in May 2018, Stats NZ said today. Higher prices and more quantities of lamb exported boosted this month’s level. The previous high for lamb exports was $340 million in February 2009.

“It has been a strong month for meat exports in general, with both lamb and beef increasing in quantities,” international statistics manager Tehseen Islam said.

Meat exports were up $119 million (17 percent) to $812 million. Quantity was also up 12 percent.

Lamb exports were the biggest contributor to the rise in meat, with value up $89 million (32 percent) and quantity up 22 percent. Exports of lamb were up to all major markets, including China and the European Union.

Beef exports were up $16 million (4.5 percent) to $359 million, with more exports to China. This increase was partly offset by a fall to the United States.

Overall exports were up $509 million (10 percent) to $5.4 billion, with meat exports having the largest increase. This exports total is the second highest for any month. The highest exports total was $5.5 billion in December 2017.

Forestry products had the second-largest increase in exports, up $99 million (26 percent) to $477 million. The largest increases were to China, Singapore, and Hong Kong.

Motor vehicles lead imports rise

The value of total imports rose $277 million (5.7 percent) in May 2018 to reach $5.1 billion, as New Zealand imported more cars, but fewer petroleum products than a year ago.

Imports of cars rose $78 million (17 percent) in May. This boosted overall imports of vehicles, parts and accessories to $924 million, up $185 million compared with the same month last year.

In contrast, petroleum and products imports fell $196 million (30 percent) to $455 million in May 2018. Crude oil led this fall, down $256 million to $68 million.

Refining NZ reported that maintenance shutdown at the Marsden Point refinery went into full swing from 7 May. This work is scheduled to be completed in mid-June.

Crude oil was at its lowest value and quantity since May 2005.

Mechanical and electrical machinery and equipment were the other main contributors to the imports rise.

The monthly trade balance was a surplus of $294 million (5.4 percent of exports), higher than the average monthly surplus in the last five May months.

For the year ended May 2018, the annual trade deficit was $3.6 billion (6.5 percent of exports). This compares with an annual trade deficit of $3.8 billion (7.7 percent of exports) in the year ended May 2017.

For more information about these statistics:

                     Tables (Excel)      

 (See attached file: overseas-merchandise-trade-may-2018.xlsx)

Young people choose to earn, not learn – Stats NZ Media Release

Young people choose to earn, not learn – People in their early twenties are more likely to be earning and less likely to be learning, Stats NZ said today.

Since 2004 (when the series began), 20–24-year-olds have been the key contributors to the number of young men and women not in employment, education, or training (NEET).

This story looks at the six-year period to the March 2018 quarter, when 15.2 percent of 20–24-year-olds were not earning or learning, down from a peak of 19.7 percent in the March 2012 quarter.

Over that period, the proportion of working 20–24-year-olds has grown from 65.2 percent to 74.1 percent. This was the largest increase for any age group. Men and women contributed to the rise nearly equally – up 32,500 and 31,900, respectively. For both men and women, the key contribution to employment growth came from those who were working and not in education. The number of working women not in education increased by 37,600, while men saw a smaller rise (up 29,200).

While the population of 20–24-year-olds has increased over the last six years (up 49,900 to 357,700), the number of people in this age group who are not in the labour force (NILF) has fallen to 67,100 (down 6,400). This fall was largely driven by women (down 11,300).

In the March 2012 quarter, 17,500 (11.4 percent) of 20–24-year-old women were not in the labour force or education due to caregiving. Six years on, this number has dropped to 10,400 (6.1 percent).

“This drop is in line with a fall in birth rates since 2008,” labour market statistics manager Sean Broughton said. “This fall in birth rates mainly reflects young women aged 15–29 years, whose birth rates are now at a record low.”

Fewer 20–24-year-olds in education

Since the March 2012 quarter, the proportion of people aged 20–24 years who were in education, regardless of their labour force status, has decreased from 31.8 percent to 24.3 percent. This was the lowest point since the series began. However, the proportion of 20–24-year-olds with no qualifications has also fallen from 14.1 percent to 8.2 percent.

Over the last six years, there has been a large increase in the proportion of 20–24-year-olds with a school qualification as their highest qualification. In the March 2018 quarter, nearly half (48.2 percent) of all 20–24-year-olds were in this position (up from 39.6 percent in the March 2012 quarter). People in their early twenties were also less likely to have a post-school qualification (41.6 percent, compared with 45.1 percent), but more likely to have a bachelor’s degree or above (20.5 percent, compared with 12.8 percent).

The most recent data shows 66,800 more 20–24-year-olds were working and not in education than in the March 2012 quarter. Two-thirds of the increase came from people with a school qualification as their highest qualification, while two-fifths came from those with a bachelor’s degree.

Compared with six years ago, those with a school qualification as their highest level of attainment were less likely to be in education – 35.5 percent, compared with 50.1 percent. This is the lowest point since the series began. However, they were more likely to be working – 70.8 percent (up from 61.6 percent).

“This data suggests that many young people are heading straight into the workforce after completing their school education, rather than continuing with further study,” Mr Broughton said. “Almost all of the increase in the number of working people whose highest qualification was achieved at school was from those who were working, but not in education.”

20–24-year olds with a bachelor’s degree as their highest qualification were also more likely to be working (83.9 percent) and less likely to be in education (16.7 percent) or NEET (10.0 percent) than in 2012. This group saw a particularly large rise in the percentage of those employed and not in education (72.6 percent, up from 58.4 percent).

Employment growth

Almost one-third of working 20–24-year-olds moved into professional occupations (eg roles such as teachers, architects, or nurses). Other growth occupations were sales workers, managers, and community and personal service workers, including both hospitality workers and carers and aides. For young men, there was also growth in the number of technicians and trade workers.

The retail trade and accommodation industry accounted for about one-quarter of the increase in working 20–24-year-olds, particularly for women. The professional, scientific, technical, administration, and support services industry saw substantial growth for both men and women, although this is a very broad category encompassing a wide range of different roles.

Amongst young women, there were also large increases in the education and training, and health care and social assistance industries.

For more information about these statistics:

Stats NZ Report: International Visitor Arrivals to New Zealand: May 2018

International Visitor Arrivals to New Zealand – The latest edition of International Visitor Arrivals to New Zealand May 2018 (IVA) is now available on the Stats NZ website.

IVA is a monthly report produced by Stats NZ and sponsored by Tourism New Zealand. It contains detailed tables and graphs of monthly and annual data, showing the number and characteristics of visitor arrivals. IVA provides information in addition to the visitor arrivals information released two working days earlier in the International Travel and Migration: May 2018 release. In particular, airport information released in the IVA is not included in the international travel and migration statistics.

 

One in five part-timers are underemployed – Stats NZ Media Release

One in five part-timers are underemployed – In 2017, one in five (20.6 percent) part-time workers wanted and were available to work more hours, Stats NZ said today. Underemployed people are those who work part time (fewer than 30 hours a week), but want and are available to increase their hours.

There were 112,300 people who were underemployed in 2017 – 63,000 of them were actively seeking more work.

Some 65 percent of underemployed people wanted to move into full-time work (30 or more hours a week); 35 percent wanted more hours but were willing to remain part-time.

The average (median) time usually worked by underemployed people was 15 hours a week. If they could have chosen their own hours, they would have opted to double that to 30 hours per week.

The following diagram shows the definition of underemployment and the relationship between underemployment and underutilisation.

“Underemployed people make up a third of the underutilised potential in New Zealand’s labour market,” labour market manager Sean Broughton said.

“Despite our labour market being ‘tight’, these people are unsatisfied with their level of participation. People who are underemployed are of interest to both potential employers and to policy-makers.”

In June 2017, underemployed people earned an average of $302.30 a week for 15 hours work. In comparison, part-timers who were not underemployed were earning $440.36 a week for 16 hours of work.

In the 2017 year, more than half (66,400) of underemployed people gave ‘a lack of available work’ as their reason for not working the hours they would like. This lack included the type of work they wanted, the hours they were available for, or the location they could travel to.  

For part-time workers, some groups were especially likely to be underemployed: people under 30 years (28.3 percent), Māori and Pacific peoples (31.2 percent and 29.3 percent, respectively), and parents with dependent children.

Part-time workers with jobs in the retail trade and accommodation, or the arts and recreation industries were more likely to be underemployed. For occupations, part-time machinery operators and drivers, labourers, or community and personal service workers (including hospitality staff) were more likely to be underemployed.

People employed on a casual basis had far higher rates of underemployment than those on permanent or fixed-term contracts.

Text alternative for diagram, The underemployment measure in 2017

Diagram shows the definition of underemployment and the relationship between underemployment and underutilisation, with data for 2017.

Employed (2,567,900) made up of Part-time (less than 30 hours) (546,600) and Full-time (30 hours or more) (2,021,200).

Part-time made up of Want more hours (136,000) and Don’t want more hours (400,300).

Want more hours made up of Not available (20,400) and the three underemployed categories of Available (112,300), Unemployed (126,600), and Potential labour force (98,600).

The three underemployed categories combine to Total underutilisation (337,600).

Figures have been rounded to the nearest hundred. Due to rounding and respondents not supplying definite answers, individual figures may not sum to stated totals.

For more information about these statistics: