Food price inflation unchanged in March 2021 – Stats NZ media and information release: Food price index: March 2021

Food
price inflation unchanged in March 2021 – Media release

15 April 2021

Overall, the cost of food in March 2021 was
the same as in February 2021, Stats NZ said today.

Even though the overall food price movement
was flat, there were many price movements. Prices for 53 percent of items
rose and 47 percent fell, but the net effect of this was no overall movement.

There were typical seasonal movements in
fruit and vegetable prices, with cucumbers up 51 percent and apples down
16 percent.

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and information release and to download CSV files:

New report shows impact of demands on land in New Zealand – Stats NZ media release

New
report shows impact of demands on land in New Zealand – Media release

15 April 2021

A new environmental report released today
by the Ministry for the Environment and Stats NZ, presents new data on
New Zealand’s land cover, soil quality, and land fragmentation.

The land cover data in the report, Our
land 2021
, provides the most up-to-date estimates of New Zealand’s
land cover and associated land use and changes.

Overseas markets are a significant driver
of land use, and with global populations projected to reach 10.9 billion
by 2100, market-based pressures on land are set to increase. Most of our
agriculture and forestry products are exported, and these activities currently
cover about half our land area, the report says.

Visit our website to read this news story
and indicator pages:

Analytical retrospective superlative index based on New Zealand’s CPI: 2020 – Stats NZ report

Analytical retrospective superlative index based on New Zealand’s CPI: 2020

14 April 2020

This report presents the results of an analytical retrospective superlative index time series based on the consumers price index (CPI) for the June 2002 and June 2020 quarters. 

This work aims to assess 1) the impact of commodity substitution on the CPI, and 2) how the CPI may have tracked had it been reweighted less frequently than the three-yearly cycle currently used.

Key findings

Results show that substitution bias has an upward effect on the CPI, and that if the CPI were reweighted less frequently, the index would be higher. Key findings from the report are summarised below.

  • The published CPI, which is calculated using a fixed-weight Laspeyres-type formula, increased 41.6 percent between the June 2002 and June 2020 quarters, an average of 2.0 percent per year.

Impact of substitution bias

  • The analytical superlative time series, calculated using a Fisher formula, increased 37.7 percent between the June 2002 and June 2020 quarters, an average of 1.8 percent per year.

Impact of less frequent reweighting

  • If no CPI reweights had happened after 2002, the CPI would have increased 50.4 percent between the June 2002 and June 2020 quarters, an average of 2.3 percent per year.
  • If no CPI reweight had happened in 2017, the CPI would have increased 4.7 percent between the September 2017 and June 2020 quarters (an average of 1.7 percent per year), compared with an increase of 4.2 percent for the published CPI over the same period (an average of 1.5 percent per year).
  • If the CPI had been reweighted every six years after 2002, the CPI would have increased 44.2 percent between the June 2002 and June 2020 quarters, an average of 2.1 percent per year.

Visit our website to read the full report: Analytical retrospective superlative index based on New Zealand’s CPI: 2020

Stats NZ release notification

Dear subscriber

Below you can find Stats NZ’s information releases for the next week. For more information about these releases go to Insights and make your selections in the drop-down options.

15 April 2021

Employment indicators: Weekly as at 12 April 2021
View recent employment indicators releases

Food price index: March 2021
View recent food price index releases

Rental price indexes: March 2021
View recent
rental price index releases

New Zealand’s environmental reporting series: Our land 2021
View recent
New Zealand’s environmental reporting series releases

16 April 2021

Research and development survey: 2020
View recent research and development survey releases

20 April 2021

National and subnational period life tables: 2017–2019
View recent national and subnational period life tables releases

21 April 2021

Effects of COVID-19 on trade: At 14 April 2021 (provisional)
View recent effects of COVID-19 on trade releases

Consumers price index: March 2021 quarter – M
View recent consumers price index releases

Other publications

19 April 2021

Wellbeing time-series explorer

16 April 2021

New Zealand Activity Index (NZAC) – includes March data


Our release calendar has a full list of release dates for official statistics.

The release calendar is updated six months ahead, but dates may change due to events related to Covid-19.

Information releases include the latest statistics for the subject, with a summary (in the Key facts section), statistical Tables, and links to metadata and related information.

M = a media conference will be held for this release.

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Update on COVID-19 and seasonal adjustment – Stats NZ methods paper

Update
on COVID-19 and seasonal adjustment – Methods paper

14 April 2021

Below is an update on our approach to seasonal
adjustment in light of COVID-19-related disruptions to activity, which
have affected our usual methods. We are conducting a review of some of
our seasonally adjusted series and will introduce any recommended changes
in our upcoming March 2021 releases.

Impact of COVID-19 on seasonal adjustment

The COVID-19 lockdown and restrictions have
caused abrupt changes to actual values for many time series.

Our standard seasonal adjustment method (X13
ARIMA SEATS), was not able to handle the extreme movements in data points
resulting from COVID-19-related disruptions in activity. X13 ARIMA allocated
too much of the unusual value to the seasonal and trend components instead
of the irregular component.

Untreated, this would have significantly
altered the seasonal factors and caused large and undesirable revisions
to the seasonally adjusted time series. As the COVID-19 disruption in the
June 2020 quarter was an abrupt shock, it should be reflected in the irregular
component and not affect historical seasonal patterns; allowing this would
be incorrect and misleading.

To remedy this, we have identified and treated
unusual data points for affected time series using additive outliers so
that they were attributed to the irregular component.

For further information, see Impact
of COVID-19 on seasonally adjusted and trend series
.

Visit our website to read this methods
paper:
Update
on COVID-19 and seasonal adjustment

Stats NZ information release: Effects of COVID-19 on trade: At 7 April 2021 (provisional)

Effects
of COVID-19 on trade: At 7 April 2021 (provisional) – Information release

14 April 2021

Effects of COVID-19 on trade is a weekly
update on New Zealand’s daily goods trade with the world. Comparing the
values with previous years shows the potential impacts of COVID-19.

The data is provisional and should be regarded
as an early, indicative estimate of intentions to trade only, subject to
revision.

We advise caution in making decisions based
on this data.

Visit our website to read this information
release and to download CSV files:

Stats NZ information release: International travel: February 2021

International
travel: February 2021 – Information release

14 April 2021

Key facts

Monthly arrivals

Overseas visitor arrivals were down by 367,400
to 5,300 in February 2021, compared with February 2020. The biggest changes
were in arrivals from:

  • Australia (down 131,400)
  • United States (down 51,800)
  • United Kingdom (down 37,900)
  • Germany (down 15,900)
  • Canada (down 13,400)
  • Japan (down 12,900)
  • Korea (down 11,000)
  • India (down 7,800)
  • France (down 6,300)
  • Netherlands (down 5,100).

Overseas visitor arrivals decreased by 200
to 5,300 in February 2021, compared with January 2021.

Visit our website to read these information
releases:

Net migration loss of non-New Zealand citizens – Stats NZ media and information release: International migration: February 2021

Net
migration loss of non-New Zealand citizens – Media release

14 April 2021

Annual migrant departures exceeded migrant
arrivals among non-New Zealand citizens for the first time since the late
1970s, Stats NZ said today.

In the February 2021 year, a provisional
net loss of 1,400 non-New Zealand citizens and a net gain of 18,900 New
Zealand citizens made up an overall net migration gain of 17,400.

“Historically, New Zealand has had an annual
net migration gain of non-New Zealand citizens and an annual net migration
loss of New Zealand citizens,” population indicators manager Tehseen Islam
said.

Visit our website to read this news story
and information release:

March card spending rebounds despite COVID – Stats NZ media and information release: Electronic card transactions: March 2021

March
card spending rebounds despite COVID – Media release

13 April 2021

There was a lift in retail card spending
in March following a fall in the lockdown-disrupted February month, Stats
NZ said today.

Seasonally adjusted retail card spending
rose by $53 million (0.9 percent), compared with February 2021.

Visit our website to read this news story,
information release, and to download CSV files: